Royal Charity Premiere…

Historically, the Superman movie premieres had always been lavish events that had benefited charities such as the Special Olympics.

With the considerable coup of the Royal audience and always the showmen, Cannon Films producers Golan & Globus had planned to have both leading men arrive in costume to the Leicester Square Odeon for the first showing.  Despite the attendance of his family, Christopher Reeve is notable by his absence, leaving Nuclearman Mark Pillow to fend for himself alongside co-stars Margot Kidder and Mariel Hemmingway.  First, he has fun.

From the top, original programme and scarce images of the reception culled from the Spanish edition of Hello magazine…

 

Truth & Justice In MK…

Its a little-known fact that the final chapter of the classic Superman Movie series was shot entirely in the UK.  A great proportion of exterior scenes were shot in MIlton Keynes as the new town with its modernist architecture was considered to be a reasonable representation of a US city of the era.

Naturally the prospect of Hollywood coming to town was a considerable coup and the world’s press were out in force to cover the filming.  From the top, a never-before published shot of Christopher Reeve as Clark Kent outside Milton Keynes train station shot on 17/11/1986 by Ian Blackmore, an article from the Financial Times discussing the location and headline from the MIlton Keynes Citizen declaring Superman was in town.  These archive clippings were discovered in the archive on Milton Keynes public library on a trip to visit filming locations years later…

 

“World On The Brink…”

The quest for global box-office domination through promotion – Daniel Goozee’s definitive original painting for the marketing of Superman IV: The Quest For Peace was adapted for overseas markets with wildly varying results (and replaced altogether in France).   Translations of the title would also yield some interesting interpretations of the theme – In Germany ‘The Quest For Peace’ would become ‘World On The Brink’ and ‘The Strongest Enemy’ for the Japanese campaign.

From the top; German poster (‘artist’ unknown) alternative artwork for the French poster (artist unknown) a magazine ad for the Brazillian home video release and the Japanese one-sheet. Despite the customarily glossy marketing the movie would go on to gross $15,681,020 worldwide and would be considered the flop that ended the franchise…