Supermannequin…

A truly incredible and unique display – this intricate life-size creation was on loan from Stephen Lane’s (Propstore of London) personal collection to the Movieum Of London (now rebranded The London Film Museum) last year.

Not only is the reworked portrait of Christopher Reeve generated from one of Stuart Freeborn’s few surviving lifecasts but the costume is 100% original and one of the finest examples still in existence today.  Worn by Reeve and screen-matched to the Luthor’s lair confrontation scenes in Superman: The Movie and the alleyway change scene in Superman II, the costume is ideally preserved on a custom mannequin and standing proudly in the magnificent rooms of County Hall, a breathtaking and eerie experience to behold.

The detail evident in the images above were so revealing I was able to compile arguably the most definitive article to date about the Superman costume hosted exclusively here

 

Tom Mankiewicz, 1942 – 2010….

A rare interview from the Starlog Yearbook with the ‘Creative Consultant’ who only recently received full & true recognition for his contribution to the Superman movie mythos.

Chances are you’ve seen most of the pictures he’s written without even knowing it- especially if you are a fan of the Bond franchise. Tom has a special place in the hearts and minds of all Superman fans and we salute him, he will be sadly missed…

 

Just The Beginning…

You have to hand it to the late Alexander Salkind – Only an old-school producer of his calibre would reserve no less than seven pages of legendary trade paper Variety (four shown, the remaining 3 consisting of the crystal shield artwork) to announce Superman III was in pre-production.

Salkind’s gift for publicity and association with Variety goes back as early as 1976, when preliminary announcements for the acquisition of the property from DC Comics started appearing followed up by the unprecedented news that the legendary Marlon Brando himself had signed up for the project.  These fragile ads on newspaper stock are now treasured records of film history and should be preserved as such…