65…

Today marks what would’ve been Christopher Reeve’s 65th birthday and forty years to the day where he turned 25 on the set of Superman: The Movie.

One cannot help but wonder what Reeve would be doing now had his life not taken such a fateful turn in 1995.  It would seem (by Hollywood standards) that being of pensionable age no longer inhibits the revival of vintage franchises (see Harrison Ford) so its concievable that Reeve would still be involved in some capacity with his most celebrated turn – maybe even as a director.  Indeed, just before his accident Reeve seemed to be set on a return to the mainstream again, appearing in the critically accalaimed Remains of the Day alongside cult fare like The Village of The Damned.  Tragic, then, on one hand that his best work onscreen may have been to come but on the other, his pioneering efforts on behalf of the disabled commuinity will surely serve to change lives for the better all over the world.

SUPERMANIA is proud to help preserve the legacy with this newest addition to the collection, a significant find that surfaced only recently after more than 40 years.   Many Superfans are aware that lifecasts/masks were taken by makeup supremo Stuart Freeborn for most of the lead actors and that recasts of Reeve’s have been circulating for a number of years (click here).  These reproductions were of an altered cast made for production (where the eyes were cut out for the purposes of adding false ones later) so are more of an SFX curio than a ‘standard’ lifecast.  These, along with a few other variations offered by Propstore over the years (serving as wig mounts and suchlike) were belived to be the only existing examples remaining from the series after Freeborn’s passing.

So imagine the surprise when a complete, almost full-head casting with superb detail appears from nowhere and instantly becomes the definitive source for reference to date.  While some consider lifecasts to be ghoulish, this fibreglass pull is nonethess a superb impression of the late actor.  Note how it compares in size with the older FX casting (third pic) having shrunk many generations down the line.  Though the newer cast isn’t perfect (suffering from some distortion and lack of clarity around the nose)  its shortcomings are made up for by the inclusion of the ears, a very uncommon feature to survive the process…

We miss you, ‘Toph…

L’Art de DC…

As a great editor once said – ‘Well if Paris is gonna go kablooey I want my best reporter right in the middle of it’ – and so SUPERMANIA brings you the lowdown on the gleaming new exhibition in France which opened to the public this week.

Quite out of nowhere and “In collaboration with DC Entertainment and with the participation of Warner Bros. Consumer Products, The Art Ludique Le Musee presents “The Art of DC – The Dawn of Super Heroes,” a unique world first exhibition that pays tribute to the story of DC and its iconic Super Heroes and Villains such as Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and the Joker at the origin of a true contemporary mythology. 

An original creation of the Art Ludique-Le Musée team, “The Art of DC – The Dawn of the Super Heroes”, unveils more than 250 original historical plates and more than 300 works of research from the cinema and many Costumes and genuine props from the films

We also present the authentic costumes created for the great DC movies such as the mythical costume worn by Christopher Reeve in Superman and the famous costume worn by Lynda Carter in Wonder Woman in the 1970’s…”

While this may be an all-new installation some of the artefacts shown may look familiar.  Indeed, the Superman costume is the same one remounted from the 75th anniversary showcase at comic-con in 2013.

The Clark Kent ensemble, however (third pic) is more of a mystery and may be comprised of genuine suit pieces over a screenused Superman tunic completed with replacement glasses and hat.

The real finds here though are the miniature costumes for special effects flying models of Reeve & Kidder for the ‘Can you read my mind’ sequence in ‘Superman – The Movie’ (third pic).  These wonderful, intricate creations were never seen in the finished picture but remain a  testament to the ingenuity of the art dept. as the Superman costume, for example, is made form the same fabric as the full-size outfits.  Set in a glass case surrounded by hand-drawn storyboards, its as fine a collection of Super-movie history collected in one place you’re ever likely to see…

  • From  March 31, 2017 to September 10, 2017
  • Address : 34 Quai d’Austerlitz – 75013 Paris (metro station Gare d’Austerlitz, parking paying opposite)
  • Prices : 16.50 € (regular rate), 13.50 € (reduced rate), 11 € (children from 4 to 12 years or group +20)
  • Opening hours : Monday: 11:00 – 19:00, Wednesday: 11:00 – 19:00, Thursday: 11:00 – 22:00 – Nocturne, Friday: 11:00 – 19:00, Saturday: 8 pm, Sunday: 10 am – 8 pm

A Sentimental Replica…

DSC_3218 (2)DSC_3224DSC_3210DSC_3222First shown case-fresh over a year ago on SUPERMANIA, Mattel’s DC Comics Multiverse 4″ General Zod action figure returns to Planet Houston having endured the full custom treatment.

Now somewhat more worthy of the ‘Highly detailed and authentic’ promise of the packaging, the discerning adult collector would surely appreciate the subtle cosmetic changes made to match this figure to his screen counterpart as shown in Superman II (and perhaps more literally in the Donner Cut)

In fact as custom mods go, this was a relatively simple task as the sculpt for the scale is rather magnificent and only diminished by a stock paintjob.  If anything the challenge here was to find a paint that would replicate the metallic maroon finish of the actual costume trim and boots (the boots themselves now residing at Propstore, click here for the story). When Mattel correctly emulated this detail on their great 1/6 scale Movie Masters figure in 2010 it was met with derision as the costume was generally perceived to be jet black. There would be no such ‘mistake’ with this later release.

Having tested dozens of colour combinations salvation would come in the form of nail polish of all things – a perfect balance of colour and shine applied to the appropriate areas – (top pic) only betraying hints of the maroon (second pic) just like the original costume on film.

With only a few more embellishments (chest hair and silvered temples) the figure was finished and photographed against the perfect backdrop of the Hot Toys Superman figure and the result when compared to the factory version speaks for itself.

The Superman figure from this line is next to receive the custom treatment but is typically a far more complex and intricate job – look out for him in a future post..!

“He Can Fly Now…”

AKQuarterReeve1AKQuarterReeve2ArnieQuarter

SUPERMANIA returns after a spell in the Phantom Zone with an all-new update from our friend and longtime Superfan favourite Arnie Kim.

Perhaps best known as the talented sculptor responsible for his incomparable likenesses and scale replicas of Bruce Lee, his 1/6 scale Christopher Reeve Superman head for Hot Toys also remains the standard by which all others are judged –

But now Arnie has surpassed himself with the above reveal of this one of a kind semi-poseable mixed media quarter scale figure entitled ‘He Can Fly Now’ featuring accurate fabric costume (Designed by Yeo Jeungmin) and miniature acrylic eyes.

SUPERMANIA has faithfully followed Arnie’s progress on all his Superman projects over the last few years, from the genesis (and ultimate revision) of his Hot Toys sculpt to the limited quarter scale bust and is proud to present the culmination of his work with what must be considered the ultimate tribute to Reeve’s incarnation.

Besides the impeccable likeness (second pic) what sets the finished piece apart is the body proportions (so often overlooked by most commercial releases) where Reeve’s broad shoulders and long legs (third pic) put it in a different class than the likes of Sideshow Collectibles or the more recent offering from NECA, exhibiting a degree of realism most fans have been clamouring for.

Its not 100% perfect however – very minor quibbles regarding the size of the hands, low positioning of the belt, length of the boots and inaccurate cape shield do not detract from the overall effect where they might be dealbreakers on a lesser figure.

Alas, typically the statue is a personal work and therefore apparently not for sale until Arnie says otherwise – short runs of his bust when produced commanded stratospheric sums when offered so expect this to whip up a similar frenzy if offered.  Meantime, rumours abound of new and upcoming licensed Christopher Reeve statues from such revered companies as Blitzway and Prime One Studios, so there’s always hope…

Snap..!

DSC_1269DSC_1266DSC_1260DSC_1259-001So there may be no reveals of anything classic movie-era related coming out of New York Toyfair this month but its always nice to get something unexpected (and with no agonising waiting time) appear from nowhere.

Even having played a similar trick with their extremely popular left-field release of a 7″ tall Keaton Batman ’89 figure, it still seemed unlikely in the extreme that NECA could afford Superman similar treatment – they even said as much on Twitter and besides, didn’t Mattel have the license??

So imagine the surprise when a perfectly formed little cousin of their monster 1/4 scale pops up on the NECA website alongside an equally unanticipated Adam West ’66 Batman.

Released in conjunction with WB as a DVD Incentive (apparently the only way they were granted permission to do it) these beauties literally flew off the shelves of TRU’s all over the country and soon became the dream item of your favourite auction site’s opportunist. As for those of us across Europe desperately wanting that hole in their childhood filled too, ‘screw you’ seemed to be the prevailing attitude as this was to be a Stateside promotion only with no worldwide release pending.

Luckily for SUPERMANIA, friends and fellow SuperFans would come to the rescue and send a pair over the pond for the collection.

In hand, the figure is somewhat of a marvel but, as is common knowledge by now, their QC is abominable.  The stories of limbs snapping off like toothpicks are 100% true and the chances of finding one with without a careless paintjob were slimmer than finding one at all.

NECA got many things right.  The headsculpt (always a contentious issue) is superb, and the cloth cape mounting is the best on any Superman figure to date.  The packaging is a delight (scaling down the 1/4 scale to even better effect) instantly making this the toy you always wanted to open at Christmas.

Naturally its not all good news.  While the decal for the cape shield is a good effort, the chest logo is just as awful as the Quarter scale (where there was no excuse either) and the focal point for the worst of the paint QC.  The proportions are also slightly odd, skinny arms, narrow shoulders and short legs compounded by the thinnest belt rendering on a Reeve Superman figure so far (even Mattel got this right).  The boots go some way to making up for this but when its posed (providing you didn’t snap both legs clean off) he appears slightly bow legged.

As SUPERMANIA was one of the many infuriated by having the figure broken within seconds releasing it from the package, the decision was made to customise it, the results appearing above.  Thankfully this figure needed little in the way of adjustment to make more movie-accurate.  Printable fabric patches took care of both under-par shields (first/third pics) a little work with a craft knife added a parting to the hair (repainted to match Reeve’s hairline for the Donner years, second pic). and taking an iron to the cape (careful with this!!) made all the difference.  It was finished with gloss coat on the belt and satin on the boots.  Posed against the Hot Toys diorama (which the scale is far better suited to) and posed appropriately the result speaks for itself.

SUPERMANIA wished to thank James Sawyer (of 1989BATMAN.com and SuperFan Brian Adriaansen for their kind assistance with this post..!!