Most Iconic…

img_4998img_4976img_4979img_4968Taking its rightful place as the centrepiece in an exhibition charting a trio of cinematic Sci-Fi anniversaries, an original Superman costume stands proudly among selected screen used props currently showcased in Moyes’s Hall Museum UK.

Celebrating its 8th Sci-Fi Action exhibition in acknowledgement of 30 years of the Alien franchise, 40 years since the camera’s rolled on the original Star Wars and 50 years of Star Trek, the West Suffolk site is currently housing over 100 items of memorabilia from these enduring saga’s and more.

Described as ‘Perhaps the most iconic Movie costume of all time’ and on loan from Propstore, the Christopher Reeve Superman display has had somewhat of an upgrade since it was last seen in public at Covent Garden in 2012.  Although the costume remains the same combination of mis-matched tunic & tights last seen by SUPERMANIA on the Propstore tour, it has apparently been neatly re-mounted on the mannequin with a new \S/ shield base and the cape now sports its yellow patch – missing since the original display since its first appearance in 2010.  Stephen Lane himself told me he had the shield in storage the whole time (which accounts for its clean appearance) but had yet to re-attach it – making this the very first time the costume has been displayed 100% complete.

Superfan Andrew Hanton took the fantastic pics above and had this to say about his close encounter –

“My wife works in Bury St Edmunds and said she had seen a leaflet about a small sci-fi exhibition in Bury’s Moyse’s Hall Museum in the town centre.  I wasn’t too interested as I usually attend the big Showmasters Comicon events said ‘Mmm I don’t think I’ll bother’ – then she said ‘they have Christopher Reeve’s Superman suit on display!’ Well my reaction was ‘No way!!’
Sure enough it was true so the next day we drove to Bury to see the costume, when I walked in the room I couldn’t believe my eyes – it was a dream come true for me –  a Superman and in particular a Christopher Reeve fan since the age of 8 (I’m now 41). There it stood in a glass case and to top it off it was standing proud on a Christopher Reeve mannequin.
Although a little battered & bruised it looked amazing and to be up close to the real thing was overwhelming, the tunic was a little faded but for me that added to it, as the ‘S’ stood out vibrant in colour and proud.
We were allowed to take as many pictures and video it as we liked which was brilliant, apart from seeing this iconic suit for me it affirmed the authenticity of my ‘Super Costumes’ replica as I have to say mine is pretty damn close to the original which makes me even more pleased with it.
All in all a wonderful day and only £5 to get in – who’d of thought I’d get to fulfill a life long dream – seeing a Superman costume & in little old Bury St Edmunds…!”

The exhibition runs until Sunday November 13th so be quick if you want to share the experience of seeing it for yourself – click on the tab in the right hand column for details and be sure to leave comments here about your visit..!

Lot 774/983…

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Eubanks Entertainment & Memorabilia (Movie, Music, Sporting & Toys), 12th May 2016, 12:00pm

Lot 774
Description

Superman IV: The Quest For Peace (1987) Christopher Reeve leotard in pale blue stretch fabric with Superman logo to front, zip to back & four stud fasteners on shoulders to attach cape, label to inside, ‘ Bermans & Nathans, 40 Camden St, London NW1, Christopher Reeve 4913 Flying Superman IV ‘.

Provenance: A friend of the vendor worked on the set of the film.

Lot 983
Description

Superman – Acrylic crystal production used movie prop in the Fortress of Solitude scenes with Gene Hackman as he learns about his arch-nemesis Superman, and later in the film as Superman’s powers are taken away from him. approx 11 inches long.

Provenance: The vendors family have a long history of working on film sets in Elstree, Pinewood & Shepperton Studios. Her granddad was Bill Lowen (Rigger) & her father was Dave Lowen (Carpenter). This was given to the vendor as a gift from her father who worked at the Studios.

These two superior upcoming lots from the famed Surrey auction house represent the first original pieces of genuine Superman movie memorabilia on offer this year –

The ‘flying’ tunic (top three pics) is a great example of what distinguishes the Superman IV costume from the preceding films with its narrow bottom curve of the \S/ on the chest shield.  The lack of shorts also suggests (or harness vents) also indicate this tunic may have been used for bluescreen effects and its soiling indicates potential use for the climatic Moon battle…

Superb…

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SUPERMANIA brings you not one, but two firsts this week – an all-new series of posts on SuperFans and their collections and the first memorabilia showcase from the Salkind produced Superboy TV series from 1988 ever to be hosted on the site.
Collector and SuperFan Zach Curtis (above) volunteers his insights and shares his phenomenal collection of rarities and high-end costumes headlined by a screen-used costume (top) from the first season of Superboy and the original watercolour costume design (second pic – art by Matt Larson) from Disney Studios. Zach takes up the story below;

Zach thank you for taking the time to talk to SUPERMANIA about your superb collection. How long have you been collecting super-memorabilia and what drew you to it?

-I have been collecting Superman memorabilia since I was 13 years old and I just turned 23 this week! It’s hard to believe ten years have gone by so fast and that Superman has been a part of my life for almost half of it. I’ve always had collecting in my blood- I collected baseball cards and coins as a kid. It wasn’t until junior high school that those collecting passions shifted towards Superman after falling in love with the character through the TV show “Smallville”. I was obsessed with that show. I watched it religiously over and over again and then picked up a few comics and watched the Reeve movies. In no time at all, Superman was my guy.

What is it about the character (and which incarnation) appeals to you most and why? Do you tend to collect from a specific era?

Superman stands for truth and justice. In a world of increasing moral relativity and growing evil, Superman represents what is good about human kind. In the words of Brando’s Jor-El, “They are a great people Kal-El, they wish to be. They only lack the light to show the way”. Superman represents the good inside each one of us, the potential of what we can be. It’s inspiring to me. I think perhaps the best representation of this is Christopher Reeve’s portrayal of the character which is why I especially love collecting 70’s memorabilia. Though I really collect from all eras to be honest, because it’s not about the actor for me, it’s what the character stands for.

What was the very first Super-item you remember having at an early age and what has been the most difficult piece to add to the collection as an adult?

My collection began with two items. Around the time I started really loving the character, one of my church youth pastors gave me a Superman toothbrush he had won at a white elephant gift exchange. That same weekend I went to an arcade and won a plush Superman figure and I looked at these two items together and thought “I think this is the start of a collection”.
As far as items that have continued to remain elusive to me, I have had trouble finding original props and costumes from “Smallville” for sale which got me initially hooked on the character. Many of the 1940s merchandising has also been especially hard to obtain.

You also work in the vintage toy field which must provide great opportunities to see and obtain all sorts of collectables. What rarities have you seen and what do you recommend as good investment opportunity to fellow collectors?

Yeah it’s a fun job. I’m currently a full time student at Cedarville University and will head off to the Ohio State University for dental school next fall. A few years ago I started my business “That Vintage Toy Guy” (Find me on facebook!) to help pay for my hobby and education! It certainly has got my foot in the door with every major toy dealer in the area, which is nice to have first dibs on some cool pieces. I have seen many rare items from nearly every toy line in my time in the business, especially browsing toy shows and conventions. As far as investing, I have two pieces of advice. 1) Always buy vintage. It will always be harder to find. 2) When you don’t buy vintage, buy Lego. Lego’s (especially superhero Lego’s like Superman and Batman) tend to double in value in just a couple of years.

Has experience given you a reliable eye for valuations? What is the most scarce article you’ve ever handled and/or the most expensive? What sources or websites do you use and trust?

Absolutely! I typically buy out over 100 toy collections per year which requires me to be up to date on values and scarcity of the vintage toy and collectibles market. I base my evaluations on completed eBay listings, certain price guides and books, but mostly my own experience and a wide variety of friends who have expertise in different areas. It’s nice to be able to make a phone call to the right person and get an immediate appraisal for the rare stuff.
The rarest item I have handled in regards to my business has to be a double telescoping mushroom tip Kenner Star Wars Darth Vader prototype. It’s one of three in the world and extremely valuable. I live near Cincinnati which is where the old Kenner Toys factory was located so I get rare Kenner items from time to time, including Superman prototypes. As far as the rarest Superman item in my collection (props and costumes excluded), there are several options to choose from. I recently acquired a 1940’s clerk badge for the “Superman Bread” program and it is one of only five in the world. I have a lot of 1940’s items as their scarcity makes the hunt more fun!

As this is a site dedicated to the classic Salkind Superman Movie series please give us both your thoughts on the movies and share with us your favourite items. Do you have any props from the films?

I just LOVE the Reeve films. They are fantastic and capture the essence of the character in a beautiful way. Superman IV is obviously a little hard to get through at parts, but I will still love it just because of Reeve. I also am not a huge fan of Superman sleeping with Lois in the Fortress in the second movie, it does not seem to fit his character well, but again the movies are overall fantastic!
Props and costumes from the Salkind movies are very pricey so that has hindered my ability to collect some of that merchandise….. yet. But I still have a few things. I have one of Reeve’s capes from Superman II and a collection of hand drawn story boards from the “Kneel before Zod” sequence which is one of the most iconic in my opinion.

And please do talk us through the John Haymes-Newton Superboy costume you recently obtained – it looks to be in splendid condition and the costume design is, to my knowledge, a world-first reveal. How did you secure this and what is it about Superboy that resonates with you?

This costume was actually at a pretty big auction house and I was fortunate enough to end up with the winning bid! The costume was originally obtained from a Superboy contact by Jim Bowers and then sold to Franco Tuscanini. Franco recently passed away and his collection made available to the market. Now I am honoured to house this amazing piece in my collection.
I have always loved the Superboy television series, but the main reason that I love the costume is because it is the closest thing to a true Christopher Reeve costume I can obtain and afford at the moment. The series was also produced by the Salkinds so the costumes were made remarkably similar to Reeve’s, in some cases even recycled. A Reeve costume in the modern market will sometimes break $100,000, but I was able to obtain this for a fraction of that cost. It displays well and remains a symbol to me of everything Superman stands for and his place in Hollywood history.

And is that Tom Welling’s red T-Shirt from Smallville I see in the bottom left hand corner? Where and when did this materialise and was it a challenge to get? How do you display and maintain such expensive items?

Yes. I mentioned earlier that it has been hard to obtain original Smallville props and costumes, but this is the one iconic piece I have been fortunate enough to make my own. This was first introduced to the collector market on screenused.com (one of the most reliable sources of screen used items on the web) and then actually popped up on ebay a while ago. The very hour it was listed I messaged the seller and worked out a deal with him. It included the COA and provenance.
Displaying my items varies depending on what the item is and the rarity of the particular piece. I am currently a college student that lives near school so my collection resides at my parents in my room there. I am fast running out of room so my displays are often jam packed and tight. I still do my best to make sure everything is well lit and protected though, and use frames, cases, and other protective measures. I also use heavy curtains to block out light that may cause fading. I bought a couple glass cases from IKEA and lighting from Lowes and have picked up acrylic cases from various other places as well. My most prominent and expensive pieces obviously get the most attention as well as pieces that mean the most to me.

Have you met many Superman celebrities face to face and gotten autographs? Who was your favourite and why? Was there any one living or dead you would really want to have met?

I’ve been really fortunate to meet a host of Superman celebs. I have met- Brandon Routh, Dean Cain, Sam Huntington, Michael Rosembaum, John Glover, Justin Hartley, Stacy Haiduk, Margot Kidder, and Laura Vandervoort just to name a few. Most of these I have met at the annual Superman Celebration in Metropolis, IL. They have all been so nice it’s hard to pick a favorite. I would still LOVE to meet Erica Durance or Tom Welling from Smallville, and of course Christopher Reeve would be a dream if he was still alive.

And finally what is your ‘grail’ item from the Superman pantheon? Do you have it already? Given an unlimited budget what would be the first thing you would seek to add to your collection and why?

There are a couple pieces I would love to have, but the biggest hurdles are budget and actually tracking down the stuff. I would LOVE to own a significant costume of some kind from Erica Druance’s Lois Lane. And of course a Reeve costume would be fantastic. Action Comics #1 of course. A few years back the check that initially bought Superman from Siegel and Shuster went to auction, That would be pretty fantastic as well!

Zack Curtis, Thank you very much..!

Toy Story…

IMG_3940-001IMG_4078IMG_3947IMG_4084An American Toy Story
19 March – 30 October 2016

Just like the films that inspired the toys and collectables in our new exhibition, An American Toy Story promises to be a real blockbuster!

This exhibition explores the huge impact that movie-licensing had on toy production and the way we play. A collection of vintage treasures and modern classics, spanning over 100 years, is on display together for the very first time. Whether you’re a Disney princess or the next James Bond, you’re certain to find something to delight you in this show.

Exhibition highlights include;

Iconic early-twentieth-century celebrity dolls, including Charlie Chaplin and Shirley Temple
Classic movie posters
Early Disney toys, including a rare 1930s Donald Duck
A collection of vintage James Bond toys
Favourite toys from the Science-Fiction films of the 1980s
Superman costume worn by Christopher Reeve
An interactive room with dressing up and photo zone

Press Release;

This spring and summer, the major exhibition at the American Museum in Britain is An American Toy Story. It will appeal to avid cinema fans as well as families looking for an interesting day out, as it tells the story of the toys and games that inspired – and were inspired by – popular films.

As well as showcasing movie props, vintage toys, and memorabilia from various famous films – including James Bond, Star Wars, Snow White, Mickey Mouse, Frozen, and Toy Story – the exhibition will also give visitors the chance to take part in various interactive activities, a stop-motion animation zone, and the chance to dress up as film characters.

Exhibits will include well-loved toys displayed alongside mint-condition treasures from film buffs’ collections. Donald Duck and Shirley Temple dolls from the 1930s will appear alongside the ET Extra-Terrestrial video game from 1982; 1970s Early Bird Deal and Millennium Falcon toys can be contrasted with Buzz Lightyear 1996 action figures; and more recent films such as Frozen will be represented too.

Disney started early in the licencing and franchise business, but few other early film companies ventured into that arena as it was not seen as not very profitable. In 1977, there was a radical change when George Lucas struck his infamous deal with 20th Century Fox for a share of the merchandising rights for Star Wars. The money made from this deal exceeded box office takings and enabled Lucas to set up his own production company. It also heralded an era of film in which merchandise became both commonplace and also collectable.

Items on loan to the exhibition have come from a variety of sources ranging from children lending their beloved toys to serious collectors showing valuable and unusual pieces.

The exhibition will be open from 19 March – 30 October 2016 in the Exhibition Gallery.

Tuesday – Sunday, 12noon – 5pm. Gardens and café open from 10.30am.
Closed Mondays except during August and on Bank Holidays.

An inspired conception competently executed, this exhibit currently housed in The American Museum in Bath is sure to bring joy to children and a nostalgic misty eye to the parents.

SUPERMANIA was lucky enough to get these preview images of the Superman display as it was being installed, showing a very rare and complete costume from Superman IV: The Quest For Peace on loan from the V&A’s Hollywood Costume exhibit of a few years back.  Having just toured the world, this is a rare opportunity to see the only genuine Superman costume on display anywhere in the UK.  Unfortunately, the same restrictions on photography still apply and fans will also notice the cape has been re-mounted with the straps on the outside – Chief Curator Kate Hebert explains;

“I am aware that the Superman cape is mounted incorrectly. I am, alas, unable to correct this. The costume is a loan from the V&A Museum. They mounted the costume on the mannequin and we, as the borrowing institution, are not permitted to change it. I suspect that it has been mounted in this way for conservation reasons but I will contact them to confirm this…”

Regardless, set against a perfect backdrop and accompanied by arguably the greatest Superman action figure produced to date (Hot Toys) in such great surroundings this has all the makings of a memorable day out..!

 

Sold..!

DSC_3533DSC_3552DSC_3556DSC_3521-001An unprecedented success with many lots outperforming their estimates by thousands, the Propstore’s Entertainment Memorabilia Live Auction made headlines across the prop world while making many a collectors dream come true.

Luckily, SUPERMANIA managed a last-minute pilgrimage to The ODEON BFI IMAX in London to photograph the Superman items on display only hours before they went live.  Below are the highlights of the Super-sales along with the astonishing prices realised –

424.  Contact Sheets – £1,100

425.  Shooting Scripts – £4,750

426.  Autographed Still – £700

427.  Underwater Tunic – £25,000

429.  Large Kryptonian Crystal – £1,700

431.  Promotional Ephemera – £1,600

432.  Autographed Stills – £700

433.  Muscle Tunic – £20,000

436.  IV Script – £350

437.  Pod Prop – £4000

As expected, the well-publicised underwater tunic (second pic) stole the show with the Muscle tunic (third pic) nipping at its shorts at only five grand less.  Less expected were the amounts achieved by some of the smaller lots, with a single autographed still of Christopher Reeve going well above estimate at £700 and a folder full of essentially promotional clippings fetching £1,600 – most of which already present in the SUPERMANIA collection.

While many of these fabulous relics of movie history will take pride of place in private collections, The Starship Pod prop (bottom pic) was bought by Stateside SuperFan and Broadcaster Jay Towers, a prominent figure in Superman collecting and vocal supporter of the classic films.  SUPERMANIA wishes Jay all the best with his his purchase and hope he enjoys it for years to come..!