Nuclear Reaction…

In celebration of the 25th Anniversary of the US release of Superman IV: The Quest For Peace this month in Theaters, I present this archival feature from UK Sci-Fi magazine Starburst with insights from our favorite Nuclear Man, Mark Pillow.

Of particular note is the Superman IV prop exhibition attended by both Mark and leading lady Margot Kidder in London’s Hamley’s toy store where the interview was conducted. Notice Mark photographed next to what looks like a model of the Soviet Satellite from the opening sequence – SUPERMANIA is looking for any more pictures and info from this event – did you attend all those years ago during its seven-week run?  I’d love to hear from you…!

“Placed Aboard This Vessel…”

SUPERMANIA brings you a comprehensive update on this archive post regarding the above full-size prop re-photographed by me only days ago.  As reported previously, the Baby Kal-El Starship had been mothballed waiting to be researched for exhibition in the London FIlm Museum until its discovery and subsequent identification by a visiting fan.  The presumption was that the meteorite was the prop used in Richard Donner’s original Superman: The Movie but upon close inspection I can exclusively reveal it is in fact no such thing.  Instead, the carcass currently residing in the Great Hall is a relic from the opening scenes of Superman IV: The Quest For Peace.  Proof of this is the empty orifice in the right hand side of the inner chamber (second pic down) where the ‘Energy Module’ left by Lara as her ‘Last Gift’ to her son Kal-El emerges before being removed.  As the crash landing scenes in Donner’s ’78 picture were shot in Canada, it was always curious as to how the ship made its way back to the UK in such pristine state when Part IV’s location work was limited to these shores.  I recommend a visit to the museum to see this piece up close as its remains a well maintained prop and a genuine piece of Movie history.  Should the London Film Museum wish to update their plaque to identify the item correctly and with accompanying stills, however, they are more than welcome to contact me…

Die Filmstory…

SUPERMANIA brings you yet another intriguing European collectable – this time in the oversize form of the German Superman IV: The Quest For Peace comic adaptation. In stark contrast to the hastily produced US standard four-colour version (lacking all the attention lavished on the Superman III issue with its photo covers, etc.) and presented as a colourful, glossy magazine, this publication includes a feature and the godawful German poster (above) as a centrefold.  Quite why the European Cannon advertising exec felt the compulsion to decapitate Daniel Goozee’s beautiful one-sheet art so his four-year old child could have a go at painting around it still baffles.  That and the free publicity for NASA, even if it is to showcase their Nuclear Warhead…

‘Arnie’s Works’ Updated…

Hot from Master sculptor Arnie Kim’s facebook page come these latest stunning images of his 1/4 scale headsculpt which, with its hyper-realistic paintwork, we must presume to be finished.  With still no expansion on this being any more than Arnie’s ‘personal project’ one can only hope Hot Toys meets fans expectations once again by including this somewhere in their upcoming 1/4 scale figure lineup.  Meantime, the pictures speak for themselves – enjoy!

Free Inside..!

Issued to coincide with the release of Superman II in 1980, this exclusive set of letraset transfer sheets were dropped one at a time into packs of Nabisco Shreddies breakfast cereal.  Intended for use with various cityscape ‘action scenes’ printed on the backs of the boxes (still searching for one of these – anybody have one?  Contact me :), kids were free to create their own archaic version of the Metropolis battle.

Though amusingly primitive by today’s standards, the ‘rub down transfer’ craze would be huge in its day with a plethora of science-fiction/action movie/military/TV show offerings in sets featuring numerous figures and backdrop options.  Denied a set in its own right, the Superman series was represented only by the promo as shown above and consequently complete sets are scarce.  Should this bring on an irresistable wave of nostalgia I recommend visiting action-transfers.com for a comprehensive list…